Thursday, 20 July 2017

Teal Linen Turia Dungarees

If you follow me on Instagram you may have noticed my quest last week for the perfect pattern to use for a pair of relaxed summer dungarees. I was torn between a few options which I liked various elements of and you guys threw a few more excellent choices into the mix! One that kept coming up as a favourite were the Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees, although the Wear Lemonade Fiona were a close second and nearly won out purely because of the name! However, I really liked the classic details of the Turias, the shape of the back bib and the width through the leg. I’ve also often had success with her patterns in the past as I’m quite petite and the proportions work quite well for me. Although the samples weren’t quite the look I was after a quick Google threw up some other blogger makes using this pattern which I adored.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

I wasn’t sure on the dungaree trend when it first came about last year but over the past few months I’ve seen some really grown up and classy looks incorporating them. Combine that with the practicality of all those pockets and the fact that you can crawl, bend and run around like a toddler (which my job seems to require more than I like!) and I was sold. I actually bought McCalls 7547 back in early spring and some gorgeous grey denim to make them in but it’s been too hot for wearing that much close fitting denim in London recently and as usual I wanted to make something I could wear now! I became slightly obsessed with pinning images of summer dungarees over on Pinterest actually including a few pairs of Turias. The common features of all of them were a more slouchy relaxed leg than the slim denim pair I had been envisioning, still some element of fit through the waist to retain some femininity plus a finer softer fabric like a linen or viscose.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

I tend to find a pattern I want to work with before I find fabric but on this occasion I had the fabric before the pattern. When The Fabric Store got in touch a couple of months ago to offer me some fabric I tried hard to branch out from my usual choice of their beautiful merino jerseys. I decided it was about time I tried out some of their linen and realised it was the perfect opportunity to find some for my dungarees. They have a not huge but varied range of linen in lots of colours, weights and even prints. This floral embroidered one has particularly caught my eye! It didn’t take me long to decide on this deep teal which is enough like a denim to work as a neutral with lots of the tops in my wardrobe but is still a little bit different. It’s one of their light to mid-weight linens which is great for dress making. It has a bit of structure and weight but after a wash has just the kind of flop and movement I was after.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

As to be expected with a linen it does wrinkle quite badly but that works out quite nicely for this kind of relaxed, practical garment. It does fray but apart from that is great to work with and washes and presses beautifully. I kept my iron on a medium heat rather than high as it started to get a bit of a shine when too hot. The only thing I’m slightly unsure about is how sheer it might be in direct sunlight; I’ll need to get someone to check if they can see my pants before I go out and about! I’ve had this worry before with linen because it tends to have quite an open weave and in the past have underlined but I didn’t want to with these as I wanted to retain a lightweight feel without too much body. I had 2m of the linen (which you need for the length of the pieces) but would have had more than enough in the scraps to cut some bias binding or lining for the bib but more on that later.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

My t-shirt is a v-neck Sewaholic Renfrew Top made in one of the new marle rib knits also from The Fabric Store. This colour is plaster and is amazing stuff. It has a nice spongy thickness to it and feels soft and dense unlike a lot of the cheaper ribbing fabrics I’ve come across on Goldhawk Road. It feels nice against the skin and has great recovery. I did manage to stretch it out when sewing the sleeve hems but have managed to steam it back into shape. I omitted the cuff and hem bands as with a couple of my previous Renfrews and used a twin needle instead which I think was the cause of the problem. The ribbing comes in three other lovely neutral shades and all of them have been added to the wish-list for my next order!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

Back to the dungarees. I cut a size 38 through the bust and waist and graded out to 40 at the hips. I'm really pleased I did as I think the 38 would have been too tight across the bum. I have previously cut a straight 38 with Pauline Alice patterns (Seda Dress and Quart Jacket) but these haven’t involved fitting at the hip so I made sure to double check the finished measurements and decided I could do with the extra room. I'm pretty happy with the fit overall and they are super comfortable. I have found with my Cleo Pinafore Dress that no matter how much I shorten the straps they want to slip off the shoulders and the dress shifts around but these sit really nicely. The length through the body is just right with the straps fastened as they are. One thing to note is that I don't have all that much excess strap pulled through and I'm fairly petite so if you're tall you might want to consider lengthening the strap as a precaution.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

I'd make a couple of little tweaks to the fit if I made this pattern again. The width of the leg around the thigh is on the verge of being too tight when I lift my leg so I’d add maybe just half and inch in that area. However what I do really like about this pattern is the slimmer fit around the bum and just above it giving you a feminine shape through the back. One thing to note is that the leg is a cropped length so it’s worth measuring before you cut although them hem allowance is pretty deep which gives you a bit to play with. These are hemmed at the intended length but I'm wearing them rolled up twice the depth of the hem.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

I love all the little details of this pattern and the way they are enhanced with all that topstitching that I love to do! I think it adds a great professional looking touch to any garment on which it is appropriate. If you are going to do the double top-stitching as suggested I would recommend doing a couple of samples and noting the guide point on your machine for how far away the first and then second line of stitching should be away from the seam. I aligned the seam line with the inner edge of my machine foot for the first pass then lined that row of stitching up with the outer edge of the foot for the second. Nice and easy to follow. I kept mine subtle with a matching standard sew-all thread. I was so keen on keeping it subtle that I actually made a trip out to get some thread once I had the pattern cut out as I realised I didn't have any quite the right shade and a black or navy would have been too harsh.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

Proportionally the shape and size of all the pockets are spot on I think and I liked that there were different placement marks for different size groups as the position of pockets can have such a dramatic effect on how flattering a pattern is. The back pockets are quite small so if I was making a larger size I might consider making them a little bigger. Despite looking great the front pockets are not as roomy as I’d hoped they might be. I can only just get my hands in and I’ve got very small hands. The front bib pocket is better suited to holding my phone.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

I omitted one of the side seam zips which it seems from blog posts I've read that most people have done. I can get them on and off fairly easily with just one.The pattern calls for regular zips but I chose to go with invisible as I just love them plus my local shop didn't have the right shade of a regular. If I made proper denim pair with contrast topstitching I'd definitely like to try using an exposed metal zip and in that case would use two to make a feature of them.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

I had real trouble with threading on my dungaree clips but had great fun with the hammer setting in the buttons! I ended up figuring out the ideal length of the strap and sewing them in place once the clip was threaded on as they wouldn’t fasten securely on their own. It’s a shame they’re now not adjustable but I don’t need them to be. I used Hemline ones (the brand that come in the pink packets). All the advice I could find online for threading them seemed to involve an extra bar so you could thread the strap through one more time which would have secured it. These just would not stay in place!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

It's a great pattern in many respects but I wasn't sure about some of the finishing techniques. When you're going to the effort of using flat felled seams and all that lovely topstitching is seems a shame to finish the edges of the bib by just turning in once and topstitching, leaving a raw edge visible. With the amount this linen frayed that just wasn't an option for me but I wish I'd known from the start so I could think the finishing through. On this pair I just decided to overlock all the raw edges that were visible as it would match what I had done on the side seams of the legs. At least this looks neat, tidy and less homemade. Pauline does suggest using binding to finish any fraying fabrics and I'd like to look into this next time or alternatively lining both the front and back bib. In this Tessuti post Gabby has added a facing to the waistline which I think is a great idea and would work particularly well with a lined bib.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

Because I really had to think through the instructions and keep looking a couple of steps ahead to figure out if that was the way I wanted to finish things I didn't find myself getting mindlessly lost in the project as I do with some. Plus it was the first time I've sewn a pair of dungarees so I had no tried and tested method to fall back on! You definitely need both the written instructions and illustrations to figure your way through this one. They're good and give you the guidance you need but there's no extra tips and tricks and you definitely need to use your own sewing know-how to achieve the best results. But I had them made in one very enjoyable day and didn’t get frustrated with any part of the process.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Pauline Alice Turia Dungarees in Teal Linen from The Fabric Store

Despite having some qualms about the finishing I'm actually really delighted with how neatly these have turned out. All that topstitching gives a lovely crisp and clean result and the fabric is just what I wanted. They feel really ‘me’. Thanks to all of you who gave me pattern choice on Instagram, I definitely made the right decision. Let’s hope the lovely weather hangs about so I can get lots of wear out of these!

Saturday, 15 July 2017

Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

I haven't had all that much time for sewing in the last few months and once things slowed down I felt so bewildered by all the things I wanted to make and the growing size of my fabric stash that I wasn't sewing either. To get back into the groove of things I decided to literally go back to the drawing board, get organised and plan out my next few projects. With limited sewing time part of me has always scorned wasting any of those precious hours or planning or sketching out ideas, until last year. I put a lot of consideration into the handmade additions I made to my wardrobe last summer and found that really successful. I got so much wear out of those pieces and have been excited to get them back out again now the weather has heated up in London.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

I really don't need to be buying anymore fabric so the first step was taking stock of my stash. I'm sure most of what is in there I bought with a specific plan in mind so I wanted to revaluate and see if I still wanted to make those things or put those fabrics to better use elsewhere. I keep my stash in a big basket so it's quite hard to see what I've got and a real pain to dig something out from the bottom to check how much of it. I've tried various methods for keeping tabs over the years but never been able to keep on top of any of them. Enter the 110 Creations Sewist's Swatch Book which Beth kindly sent me a copy to try out months back.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

The notebook is organised with a page for each fabric in your stash and provides a template for noting down everything you might need to know in future, complete with space for a fabric swatch. The layout is well thought out and the fabric swatch square is always on the outer edge so you can reach it with a stapler. Whenever I've tried to catalogue things before I've never though about including fabric care instructions or the stretch percentage; both of which would be really useful to have to hand when contemplating a future project! There's a care symbol key and stretch percentage guide to measure against included at the front of the book to make this straightforward.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

Most sections on the template include options to circle rather than being left blank to fill in. Whilst for many things I find this really useful and quick on some I find it perhaps a little too restrictive. But there is always an 'other' space for writing in your own option. The 'Content' section includes a multitude of fabric types to circle yet the types of fabric on the market nowadays are endless so that won't cover all bases. I do love that one of the options is 'Mystery' though! There are numerous pieces of fabric in my stash that I have no clue to the content of! I like that the 'Length' section doesn't state whether in yards or metres as different people have their own preference but a large proportion of the pieces in my stash are leftovers from previous projects so aren't a nice round 1 2 or 3 metre piece.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

Once I got into the swing of entering things I found my own method of using the book though and it has definitely changed the accessibility of my stash, encouraging me to use it more. It is pretty time consuming to put together at first but is very quick to add individual fabrics each time you buy a new piece. Plus it's really satisfying to see all those neat and tidy pages an swatches! I can't think of a single extra thing I'd add to the template and feel like I'll never need to go rummaging through the depths of my big fabric basket again. If you feel like your stash could benefit from a good sort out and catalogue you're in luck as Beth is actually offering a 30% discount on the swatch book until Monday 17th July. Use the code SAVENOW30 at the checkout.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

Now I had a rough idea of which fabrics I'd like to use for which garments the next step was making some more detailed project plans. I used the Sew Crafty Journal for this to much success last year and have got back into the groove of that. It's great for allocating patterns to fabrics, listing what notions you might need and sketching out changes you might make to the pattern. The project pages alternate with ideas and notes pages throughout the book which is a nice mixture that doesn't restrict you. I think these areas are good for loosely jotting down and roughly sketching ideas for future projects that may not be so set in stone that they need a full project page.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

I haven't used the what went right/wrong and what I would do differently sections all that much as I found the categories quite broad for quite a limited space and often spilled over into the full page notes section overleaf to write freestyle instead. I have found it more useful for planning out ideas in advance rather than recording changes and decisions you made throughout the construction process. I think I'd prefer specific slots for jotting down the size I cut and any changes I made to the flat pattern plus how much fabric I used as I quite often get to writing a blog post and realise in all the excitement of starting to sew I didn't write these down which are kind of essential points I try to include in every review.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

But in saying that I like that it's not too specific and gives you that freedom for creativity that you need in the planning stages. I used to just make lists of my sewing plans but I'm actually quite a visual person so being able to collect fabric scraps and sketches along with written ideas I find really motivating. I particularly like that the areas for sketching are blank so that you can draw details or just elements of a project if you wish rather than full garments on human figures all the time. I'd also like to experiment with using it as a scrapbook and sticking in some inspiration images. I was unsure about what to use the small box on the right hand project page for but now I'm looking at it again it might be nice to include a photo of the finished garment to look back on!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books

I think I'm still figuring out how to get the best use of this one as a planner but going through the process of filling it out and taking the time to do the drawings actually really encourages me to devote some proper thought to a project before getting happy with the scissors. I've definitely come up with some more creative ideas as a result and made little changes to a pattern to better suit me which I've only thought about as I was sketching that part of the drawing. It encourages me to see what I probably wouldn't have seen until I'd sewn that part up if you get what I mean.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books
Last summer's sewing plans

I feel like the fact that I am finding myself with a successful handmade wardrobe has a lot to do with the fact that I took a little step back from jumping straight on the sewing machine to actually plan; considering what I wanted to wear and projects that would fill in some gaps. The planning has really fired up my sewjo again and I'm longing for a solid few days of machine time!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Planning a Handmade Wardrobe with Sewing Journals and Swatch Books
A project page from 110 Creations: A Sewist's Notebook

There are a multitude of sewing planners on the market at the moment. By Hand London have just released their PDF version complete with stash log. The fact that it's printable is brilliant as you can print as many or as few of each page type as you need. I also own the 110 Creations Sewist's Notebook (above) which I like for the big A4 pages with lots of room for scribbling lots of notes! Plus the handy needle change record and pattern catalogue sections. This one has sections for noting down alterations made and notes for next time so could be great used in combination with the Sew Crafty Journal. Both Gertie and Jenny have released sketchbooks with croquis suited to their target market. Have you used this kind of journal to plan your sewing before? What do you find useful?

Thursday, 6 July 2017

'Creating Couture Embellishment' by Ellen W. Miller

Any of my friends and family will be able to tell you that my love for books, especially huge coffee table tomes about the history of fashion, is verging on an obsession. Especially my Dad who has helped me move my ever increasing collection from flat to flat over the last decade! I have a huge bookcase of beautiful books covering sewing, costume and all genres of fashion. It may seem strange therefore that I don't often write sewing book reviews but in all honesty I have so many books and so little space now that it takes something really specially to get a yes when asked 'would you like a review copy?' It took me about 2 seconds to decide when Laurence King got in touch with me last month and I got my first peak at 'Creating Couture Embellishment' by Ellen W. Miller. YES PLEASE!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

The book is set for release here in the UK on July 17th 2017 but is a timeless sourcebook of ideas for fabric manipulation and decoration. The author has taught extensively at Boston School of Fashion, focusing on couture construction but has also worked in theatre as a costumier, wardrobe mistress and stage hand so that really interested me! I can clearly see the influence of historical costume detail in some of the embellishments and fabric treatments.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

As excited as I was for it to arrive it surpassed all my expectations when it did. I was awaiting the standard size of sewing text book but in actual fact it's a huge doorstop of a book at 400 pages. Karen from Did You Make That actually weighed hers! The morning it arrived I was on the way out of the door but stopped to have a quick flick through and ended up dragging it all the way into work with me so I could show the ladies in wardrobe how good it was. The publisher described it as a thing of beauty and it sure is.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

After the initial basic tools and techniques chapter (which I actually found much more interesting than I expected as the stitches and techniques described are relevant to couture methods) the book is divided into Fabric Manipulation and Embellishment & Trimmings. These are then divided into various subcategories including pleats, tucks and ruffles in the fabric section and bias, lace and feathers in embellishment. The embellishment section doesn't just teach you how to apply it but how to make it too! One of the largest categories is hand embroidery, then followed by ribbon embroidery which I feel like might be a good place for me to start as this is something I already understand and enjoy.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

My favourite chapter is the last in the book; Flowers. There are some jaw-droppingly beautiful creations in here, not least the carnations and fox gloves. I see a trip to VV Rouleaux coming on! I can't imagine being able to create something so lovely but the step by step instructions make it sound almost simple. Each technique is explained with a thorough combination of full colour photographs and clear diagrams.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

The visual index is probably my favourite double page spread in the book. I'm personally much more likely to be drawn to an image and be encouraged to dive into the book than I would be by a written index. It's a great idea. Just look at all those colours, fabrics and details!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

The pleating chapter fascinated me. First it takes you through how to calculate all the types of pleats you might be familiar like box pleats, knife pleats and cartridge pleats, then onto wrinkle pleating which completely blew my mind! pleats are created by compressing the fabric around various objects such as broomsticks and pipes! I particularly liked that the book also explains how to cut pattern pieces for pleated fabric and how to then sew with them. Really accessible. The clean and simple aesthetic of the book throughout really helps when trying to understand these quite complex and unusual processes. I also liked that an example of each technique is shown on a sleeve at the top of each page; it's much more inspiring to see the technique in use than a small sample.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

The detailed breakdowns of the techniques and the accuracy required for, for example, these knot fastenings pictured above really appeals to me. I personally get a lot of enjoyment from making my projects 'properly' and following instructions to the letter so this kind of intricate work is right up my street. As much as I have also enjoyed experimenting with the processes of freehand drafting and draping and being a bit more free with my sewing there is something so satisfying about following things meticulously step by step. I'm very much like that with cooking too actually; I like to have a recipe and love to bake.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

I haven't actually had the time to attempt any of the techniques yet and would love to block myself out a few days of staycation to do a little workshop. However, I feel like just reading through the book has totally opened my mind to the vast array of possibilities when working with fabrics and embellishment. In fact I feel a little overwhelmed with inspiration. I think my next step should be to sit down and take a look at my sewing queue and see which projects I might be able to work some of my newfound ideas into. Although many of the techniques ares special and unusual many of them are in fact very wearable and needn't be reserved for special occasion wear.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

The home sewing community is very lucky to have a huge number of sewing publications on offer to us but it is such a breath of fresh air to see an in depth book released for more advanced seamstress and those of us who want to take our learning a little further. This book certainly doesn't skim over the topic but gives you all the juicy details. These are the kind of books that get me excited. I know it will delight both us home sewers and the professional costume makers I work with alike.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Book Review Creating Couture Embellishment by Ellen W. Miller

This beauty of a book is now occupying pride of place on my shelves and has earned the spot ten times over for the enjoyment I've already had from it. Thank you Laurence King for my already much loved copy and for motivating me to get even more creative with my future projects. For any of you looking to take your sewing up a notch or even just branch out into some new techniques make sure to add this to your wish-list.

Monday, 3 July 2017

June Indie Pattern Update!


Hi guys! I warned you that this month's post might be a little late and brief...so here I am three days late but I think I did better than I thought keeping up with the news. What can I say...I addicted to hunting down the new patterns! I've been working on three shows at once for the last few weeks and definitely haven't been as focused as usual so please feel free to add in anything I've missed and you'd like to share in the comments below. Although with the length of the list I find it hard to believe there can be more! Make sure to check out Kate and Rachel's post over at The Foldline too for a more detailed look at some of the new releases. 

Just before I plunge into the June news I wanted to bring your attention to a new campaign by the British Heart Foundation which launched on Saturday called The Big Stitch. For the whole month of July they are encouraging us to pop into our closest BHF shop and find an item to up-cycle and give a new lease of life to no matter what your level of sewing skill. I think it's a fantastic idea supporting the slow fashion movement and a brilliant charity in the process and if you upload photos of your creations you're in for the chance of winning a prize! More info on The Big Stitch can be found here. For inspiration on customising and reinventing your charity shop finds make sure to check out Sally's blog Charity Shop Chic.


New Patterns




Pattern Updates and Expansion Packs


  • The Tailoress has been busy with the pattern updates this month. The new version of the Barbara Monokini includes the addition of a tie under the bust and the Jersey Bra and French Knicker PDF patterns have been improved too.
  • Ohhh Lulu launched the Prism add-on for her Jasmine Bra to enable you to create a sheer mesh insert or scalloped lace insert at the centre front.
  • The Fehr Trade XYT Workout Top pattern is now a layered PDF meaning you can choose to look at and print just the size(s) you want and also just the language you want too as it is now available in Dutch and French as well as English.


Sew-alongs


  • Megan Nielsen has been running a sew-along for her Rowan Bodysuit and Tee focusing on the more challenging aspects of construction and including hacks for a snap crotch, scoop neck and dress version.
  • Victory Patterns have just started a sew-along for their last pattern; the Jackie Dress. I'll be following along with this one as it's a style I've got my eye on for winter.
  • The sew-along for By Hand London's new Orsola Dress starts on 5th July. The pattern has a few fiddly construction aspects which I'm sure a photographic tutorial will be really useful for.
  • Love Notions posted a sew-along for their Rhapsody Blouse throughout June which included a dress hack and tips for inserting a lace trim which is a great addition to the boho vibe of this style.
  • Jenny from Cashmerette is part way through a sew-along for her new Webster Top & Dress over on her blog. Sometimes I love a read through a sew-along as it highlights clever construction details I'd initially missed about a pattern!


Upcoming!


  • As well as all her pattern updates and expansions The Tailoress has a new swimsuit pattern with cut out back coming soon!
  • The next pattern from The Avid Seamstress is for a Shift Dress and will be with us on 8th July.


Other Exciting News


  • Sew Over It launched their Intro to Sewing with Knit Fabrics online course earlier in the month. I tested the course which was a new experience for me and one I really enjoyed. You get patterns for and guided through the construction of both a top and a dress as part of the course and I very much recommend it for anyone new to sewing knits or anyone who wants some extra guidance or tips. 
  • The Deer & Doe Belladone Dress is the next of their patterns to get the PDF treatment and is available to download now.
  • Style Arc launched their new website which I love the clean simplicity of. They are now selling PDF downloads on their own site rather than through third parties and this means their free pattern of the month offer is now available with PDF purchases!
  • Also with a new website launching was Grainline Studio. Their website has the same lovely minimal aesthetic but is now more cohesive with everything easy to find in one place rather than add ons to the original blog.
  • By Hand London released a downloadable sewing planner including pages for project planning, stash organisation and croquis of six body types for you to sketch out ideas on. I love that it's printable so you'll never run out of the pages you need and you can keep to the pages most useful to you.

I think that's about it for the news from June. There have been a few new releases I've already spotted in the first few days of July but I'm going to save them for next month's post as usual. Here's your monthly dose of indie inspiration from the online sewing community to get you inspired at the start of a new week!




  • Carolyn has been sewing up some really beautiful underwear of late and I think this Liberty print set may be my favourite. She used a MakeBra pattern and the briefs from the Watson. I love the combination of vivid print and contrast binding and straps.
  • The Farrow Dress didn't grab me enough to make it onto the sewing queue when it was first released but Dixie has completely changed my mind with her beautiful textured chambray version.
  • I spotted Lindsay's stunning La Sylphide Blouse on Instagram a couple of months back and have been obsessed with finding as pretty a print to make my own ever since. She also made those Ginger Jeans!
  • Karen's first version (yes she'd already made two!) of the Charlie Kaftan is joyous. Great combo of fabric and style; it's a design made for Ikat!
  • My eyes honed straight in on Allie's pink Papercut Adrift Dress when I opened my blog feed one morning. I'd not clocked how lovely the ruffle details are before and in that hot pink delicate rayon they are exquisite! 


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